lets talk sustainability

Canadian Federal Sustainable Development Strategy Released

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, presenting new priorities for 2016–2019 that align with the 2030 Agenda – a set of global sustainable development goals, was released to the public in February 2016 for feedback. It reflects the government’s conviction that a clean environment, a strong economy and a good quality of life support one another.

The federal government is asking for help to improve the draft strategy. They want to hear from the public and stakeholders in order to develop high-level sustainable development goals, clear and measurable targets, and concrete action plans for the next three years. Comments on the draft strategy will be accepted until June 24, 2016.

The document is introduced with the following statement, “Sustainable development is about meeting the needs of today without compromising the needs of future generations.”

Topics in alignment with Denbow’s environmental stewardship business model include targets focused on Green Infrastructure and Sustainable Forest Management.

The draft in it’s entirety can be found at the draft website

Discussion and feedback on the draft can be made at the http://www.letstalksustainability.ca/ website.

lets talk sustainability

BCSLA Showcase

Tomorrow and Saturday we’re participating in the BC Society of Landscape Architects (BCSLA) 2016 Annual Conference and Showcase.  Landscape Architects, visit us in booth #16 to check out our models of Cascadia Green Wall System and EcoBlanket.

Looking forward to meeting  you and focusing on “Shifting Currents:  Rethinking our Relationships with Water”.

Delegate Bag imprint

POSITION OPEN: Labourer, we’re looking for you!

We have a great team and we are expanding.  With our summer labourers back in school and some labourers growing into driver positions – we are looking to hire!

Please visit our Careers page for the job posting information and to apply!

Now is the Time to Seed

Right now is the optimal time to seed… still warm weather along with heavy dews give seed the ideal conditions for growth.

Last week we applied a Terraseeded EcoBlanket onto a large slope behind three homes in Kamloops:

Kamloops EcoBlanket 2014 09 (4) Kamloops EcoBlanket 2014 09 (5) Kamloops EcoBlanket 2014 09 (7)

 

Kamloops EcoBlanket 2014 09 (11)

Check back in a few weeks for updated pictures of the green growth…

 

 

Strachan Point Erosion Control

“Highway creek crossings often go unbeknownst to the average traveller — you usually cruise over them without even noticing. There are nearly 2,800 provincial highway bridges, and most are not eye-catching landmarks like the Port Mann and Lions Gate bridges. Sure, these lesser known bridges may not be as big, but they still cross waters that can pack a real wallop, especially when the spring melt sends waters surging from the mountains.

Such is the case at Charles Creek, near the seaside residential community of Strachan Point, located between Horseshoe Bay and Lions Bay off the Sea to Sky Highway.

Destructive debris flows occurred at Strachan Point in the 1970s and 1980s, wiping out bridges and damaging the highway and local community. To counter these flows, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure constructed a debris flow catch basin facility in 1985. The basin catches debris from slides while allowing water to flow into the ocean. Our maintenance contractor cleans out the debris periodically to maintain capacity for future slides.

While debris flows no longer pose a safety risk, large amounts of water still travel along Charles Creek, scouring the creek bed and undermining its embankments. Despite the catch basin, erosion remained a threat to the highway bridge, a CN Rail bridge, and two private bridges providing access to 17 homes.

The threat ended with the final step to beat Charles Creek erosion, completed in fall 2012. Work to prevent erosion included building up the creek bed, widening the creek, reinforcing the creek bed with boulders and concrete-encased rock and reinforcing the embankments with concrete blocks along each side of the wall.

Denbow then applied Terraseeded Rip Rap Grout into the voids on both sides of the channel.

IMG_0345

 

This time lapse video shows the entire project in 1:40!

Source

Sure, these lesser known bridges may not be as big, but they still cross waters that can pack a real wallop, especially when the spring melt sends waters surging from the mountains.

Such is the case at Charles Creek, near the seaside residential community of Strachan Point, located between Horseshoe Bay and Lions Bay off the Sea to Sky Highway.

Destructive debris flows occurred at Strachan Point in the 1970s and 1980s, wiping out bridges and damaging the highway and local community. To counter these flows, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure constructed a debris flow catch basin facility in 1985. The basin catches debris from slides while allowing water to flow into the ocean. Our maintenance contractor cleans out the debris periodically to maintain capacity for future slides.

– See more at: http://tranbc.ca/2013/02/27/protecting-sea-to-sky-highway-strachan-point-from-erosion/#sthash.YDlDWy7L.dpuf

Sure, these lesser known bridges may not be as big, but they still cross waters that can pack a real wallop, especially when the spring melt sends waters surging from the mountains.

Such is the case at Charles Creek, near the seaside residential community of Strachan Point, located between Horseshoe Bay and Lions Bay off the Sea to Sky Highway.

Destructive debris flows occurred at Strachan Point in the 1970s and 1980s, wiping out bridges and damaging the highway and local community. To counter these flows, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure constructed a debris flow catch basin facility in 1985. The basin catches debris from slides while allowing water to flow into the ocean. Our maintenance contractor cleans out the debris periodically to maintain capacity for future slides.

– See more at: http://tranbc.ca/2013/02/27/protecting-sea-to-sky-highway-strachan-point-from-erosion/#sthash.YDlDWy7L.dpuf

Sure, these lesser known bridges may not be as big, but they still cross waters that can pack a real wallop, especially when the spring melt sends waters surging from the mountains.

Such is the case at Charles Creek, near the seaside residential community of Strachan Point, located between Horseshoe Bay and Lions Bay off the Sea to Sky Highway.

Destructive debris flows occurred at Strachan Point in the 1970s and 1980s, wiping out bridges and damaging the highway and local community. To counter these flows, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure constructed a debris flow catch basin facility in 1985. The basin catches debris from slides while allowing water to flow into the ocean. Our maintenance contractor cleans out the debris periodically to maintain capacity for future slides.

– See more at: http://tranbc.ca/2013/02/27/protecting-sea-to-sky-highway-strachan-point-from-erosion/#sthash.YDlDWy7L.dpuf

Sure, these lesser known bridges may not be as big, but they still cross waters that can pack a real wallop, especially when the spring melt sends waters surging from the mountains.

Such is the case at Charles Creek, near the seaside residential community of Strachan Point, located between Horseshoe Bay and Lions Bay off the Sea to Sky Highway.

Destructive debris flows occurred at Strachan Point in the 1970s and 1980s, wiping out bridges and damaging the highway and local community. To counter these flows, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure constructed a debris flow catch basin facility in 1985. The basin catches debris from slides while allowing water to flow into the ocean. Our maintenance contractor cleans out the debris periodically to maintain capacity for future slides.

– See more at: http://tranbc.ca/2013/02/27/protecting-sea-to-sky-highway-strachan-point-from-erosion/#sthash.YDlDWy7L.dpuf

Sure, these lesser known bridges may not be as big, but they still cross waters that can pack a real wallop, especially when the spring melt sends waters surging from the mountains.

Such is the case at Charles Creek, near the seaside residential community of Strachan Point, located between Horseshoe Bay and Lions Bay off the Sea to Sky Highway.

Destructive debris flows occurred at Strachan Point in the 1970s and 1980s, wiping out bridges and damaging the highway and local community. To counter these flows, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure constructed a debris flow catch basin facility in 1985. The basin catches debris from slides while allowing water to flow into the ocean. Our maintenance contractor cleans out the debris periodically to maintain capacity for future slides.

– See more at: http://tranbc.ca/2013/02/27/protecting-sea-to-sky-highway-strachan-point-from-erosion/#sthash.YDlDWy7L.dpuf

Sure, these lesser known bridges may not be as big, but they still cross waters that can pack a real wallop, especially when the spring melt sends waters surging from the mountains.

Such is the case at Charles Creek, near the seaside residential community of Strachan Point, located between Horseshoe Bay and Lions Bay off the Sea to Sky Highway.

Destructive debris flows occurred at Strachan Point in the 1970s and 1980s, wiping out bridges and damaging the highway and local community. To counter these flows, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure constructed a debris flow catch basin facility in 1985. The basin catches debris from slides while allowing water to flow into the ocean. Our maintenance contractor cleans out the debris periodically to maintain capacity for future slides.

– See more at: http://tranbc.ca/2013/02/27/protecting-sea-to-sky-highway-strachan-point-from-erosion/#sthash.YDlDWy7L.dpuf

Sure, these lesser known bridges may not be as big, but they still cross waters that can pack a real wallop, especially when the spring melt sends waters surging from the mountains.

Such is the case at Charles Creek, near the seaside residential community of Strachan Point, located between Horseshoe Bay and Lions Bay off the Sea to Sky Highway.

Destructive debris flows occurred at Strachan Point in the 1970s and 1980s, wiping out bridges and damaging the highway and local community. To counter these flows, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure constructed a debris flow catch basin facility in 1985. The basin catches debris from slides while allowing water to flow into the ocean. Our maintenance contractor cleans out the debris periodically to maintain capacity for future slides.

While debris flows no longer pose a safety risk, large amounts of water still travel along Charles Creek, scouring the creek bed and undermining its embankments. Despite the catch basin, erosion remained a threat to the highway bridge, a CN Rail bridge, and two private bridges providing access to 17 homes.

The threat ended with the final step to beat Charles Creek erosion, completed in fall 2012. Work to prevent erosion included

  • Building up the creek bed
  • Widening the creek
  • Reinforcing the creek bed with boulders and concrete-encased rock
  • Reinforcing the embankments with concrete blocks along each side of the wall

See the work for yourself in this time lapse video:

– See more at: http://tranbc.ca/2013/02/27/protecting-sea-to-sky-highway-strachan-point-from-erosion/#sthash.YDlDWy7L.dpuf

Highway creek crossings often go unbeknownst to the average traveller — you usually cruise over them without even noticing. – See more at: http://tranbc.ca/2013/02/27/protecting-sea-to-sky-highway-strachan-point-from-erosion/#sthash.YDlDWy7L.dpuf
Highway creek crossings often go unbeknownst to the average traveller — you usually cruise over them without even noticing. – See more at: http://tranbc.ca/2013/02/27/protecting-sea-to-sky-highway-strachan-point-from-erosion/#sthash.YDlDWy7L.dpuf
Highway creek crossings often go unbeknownst to the average traveller — you usually cruise over them without even noticing. – See more at: http://tranbc.ca/2013/02/27/protecting-sea-to-sky-highway-strachan-point-from-erosion/#sthash.YDlDWy7L.dpuf
Highway creek crossings often go unbeknownst to the average traveller — you usually cruise over them without even noticing. – See more at: http://tranbc.ca/2013/02/27/protecting-sea-to-sky-highway-strachan-point-from-erosion/#sthash.YDlDWy7L.dpuf

Specifying Denbow Products

Leading in innovation, Denbow now provides a comprehensive range of cost-effective ‘Green’ products and services that are compliant with LID (low Impact Development), LEED, BC Landscape Standard and Built Green Canada.

View the complete list and see our lunch & learn opportunities here.

Denbow Specifications

The Business of Living Architecture

“Green Roofs, Living Walls and Rain Gardens:BC Business Exports Innovative Technology to North America. For Landscape Architects, the Sky is the Limit!”

In his April 2014 article in Sitelines, a BCSLA publication, Randy Sharp of Sharp & Diamond acknowledges BC Landscape Architects for their success over the past 50 years in living architecture and green roof design. The entire issue is dedicated to the innovations the industry has created.

Page 14 mentions the urban gardens run by SOLEfood farms – Denbow installed soil into the unique raised planters by blower truck.

Read on to page 16 & 17, and Denbow’s technical project coordinator,  David Adkins, writes about “The Dynamics of Bio-Engineering and Green Infrastructure”.  Let us know what you think or if you have questions about our green infrastructure products.

Dynamic BioEngineering

 

Global Landscaping Supplies

We are proud of our client relationships. And we’re proud to share the observations of those who know best what it’s like to work with – See more at: http://www.infinitive.com/client-experience/testimonials/#sthash.XFmwPelG.dpuf

We love our clients, and we love to share their observations about their experience with Denbow:

“We originally contacted Denbow because we were looking for another decorative alternative to rock and regular fir/hemlock bark mulch that was also in a comfortable price range. Our customers are very pleased with the variety of selections and that the product color lasts longer and doesn’t decompose as quickly. Love the vibrant colors and of course the price levels. Denbow’s staff is always friendly, willing to listen and accommodating even given that we are a small landscape yard. We’d always recommend Denbow for the quality and cost of the products as well as the service received. We have also referred Denbow’s mulch blowing service for the unreachable backyards and slopes”

Pat @ Global Landscaping Supplies Ltd

7085 Bridge Street, Mission BC

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